Turquoise is perhaps the oldest stone in man’s history, the talisman of kings, shamans, and warriors. 

 The name Turquoise is derived from the French, pierre turquoise, meaning “Turkish stone,” because the trade routes that brought Turquoise to Europe from the mines in central Asia went through Turkey, and Venetian merchants often purchased the stone in Turkish bazaars. [Simmons, 419] 

 For thousands of years, Turquoise has spanned all cultures, prized as a symbol of wisdom, nobility and the power of immortality. [Eason, 239] Among the Ancient Egyptians, Persians and Chinese, Aztecs and Incas of South America, and Native North Americans, Turquoise was sacred in its adornment and for power, luck, and protection. 

 Turquoise has always been valued as an ornamental gem, often considered a symbol of male power. Anselmus de Boot, court physician of Emperor Rudolph II, wrote in 1609 that Turquoise was so highly regarded by men that no man considered his hand to be well adorned unless he wore a fine Turquoise. [Kunz, 111] Today, we know Turquoise empowers men and women equally, and worn or carried, it is a talisman of luck, success, ambition and creativity. [Eason, 239] 

 In the workplace, Turquoise promotes leadership, assists relocation or regular travel associated with career, and helps avoid unwise investments. It helps overcome writer’s block, and is a stone of clear communication when giving information; an especially good amulet for those who work in the law, or for local or central government. [Eason, 41, 239] Turquoise is especially recommended for accountants and computer operators for mental relaxation, for those who work in radio or television to release anxiety, and for laborers to protect from bodily harm. [Mella, 129-132]